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Bella Thorne’s Jewelry Line Adds Some Drama With Its New Men’s Capsule

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Actor and entrepreneur Bella Thorne may be best known for her work in film and music, but with her fourth jewelry capsule launch—her first for men—Thorne is making a statement of how she wants her gender-neutral pieces to be viewed and worn.

Thorne as a brand includes jewelry and smoking accessories; she also operates a cannabis brand called Forbidden Flowers. Thorne debuted in October with its first full collection of 32 pieces, including 14k gold–plated charms, natural pearls, and crystals.

The brand, which describes itself as opulent and provocative, is made in Los Angeles—and its designs show a connection to the West Coast vibe and Thorne’s own rock and roll style. Each capsule collection has its own story, like her first drop called Rose & Reign, which includes hand-strung pearls entangled in barbed wire.

Thorne bracelets
Pearls, which have been a trend in men’s jewelry over the last year, make a significant appearance in Bella Thorne’s latest jewelry drop. The line’s Forbidden Lies with pearls and barbed wire comes in a bracelet ($105) and necklace. 

With her men’s jewelry drop, Thorne stays on trend with that’s new for 2023 with mixed metals, a signet ring that doubles as a weed grinder, and black pearls. The capsule, entitled Volume III The Sacred Kingdom, also features bracelets, necklaces, and huggies.

“Volume III The Sacred Kingdom breaks boundaries and unveils mysteries while blending elegance and grace with strength and grit,” Thorne says. “The collection has the unlikely pairing of crystal pearls enmeshed in cutting barbed-wire designs, made for all beings looking for gender-neutral statement pieces.”

Thorne’s men’s capsule comes at a time when men’s jewelry is exploring new territory across brands. There have been big jewelry moments over the past few months with celebrities such as the singer Drake showing off a custom- necklace made up of 42 diamonds—each said to represent a time he thought about proposing to someone.

Drake worked with luxury jewelry designer Alex Moss on the necklace, which drew praise for its glamour and also some criticism for its over-the-top drama. The necklace, which Drake called Previous Engagements, totaled 351.38 carats. Some have speculated that the necklace likely retails for more than $4 million.

Thorne earring
The Betrayal huggie earrings feature pave crystals for a dramatic look that highlights Thorne’s rock and roll aesthetic.

Thorne herself has said that she wants her jewelry to be accessible, so she priced her jewelry between $30 and $380. She recently told The New York Times that she works with a second-generation family of jewelers to design her pieces, which starts with a mood board and 3D renderings she approves before they are manufactured.

The actor also wanted to create a dynasty to honor her father, Delancey, who died in 2007. Her father gave her mother jewelry on special occasions, Thorne told The New York Times, so she hoped to create jewelry that also allowed for those kinds of proud moments.

The Thorne men’s capsule has its own drama in each piece. For example, the Forbidden Lies bracelet and necklace at $105 and $135, respectively, is a mix of black pearls against small silver or gold twists of barbed wire.

The Betrayal dagger huggies at $125 “remind your enemies that you are not to be challenged,” according to the brand. They are  encrusted with pavé crystals and brass plated in 14k gold or rhodium. They are sold as a pair or individually.

The Up in Arms Crusher ring is part of the smokers’ collection and features tiny spike details on the face. The $55 ring comes in silver or the option of 14k triple-plated gold.

Top: Bella Thorne’s gender-neutral jewelry line recently debuted its first men’s capsule collection, including a signet ring ($55) that doubles as a grinder (photos courtesy of Thorne). 

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Karen Dybis

By: Karen Dybis

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