Gem Pricing Report

Buyers are gradually returning to the gemstone industry. Encouraging activity is being reported as the market sets its sights on JCK Las Vegas. During the past two years, retailers had moved away from inventory building, but purchasing at the February Tucson, Ariz., shows and Baselworld demonstrate that retailers want to buy stock, although they remain cautious. Jewelers are reluctant to push price points much above the $1,200 mark. With unemployment and underemployment still high and lending restricted for even high-quality applicants, consumer spending is strongest below $1,200 or above $6,000.

In colored stones, blue sapphire and emerald are attracting attention. The lead-glass fracture filling of ruby is creating nomenclature issues regarding the nature of the product. Although sold as a natural but clarity-enhanced gem, several labs including AGL and GIA Thailand have conducted experiments on samples of the material, concluding that much of this product is “composite ruby” where glass is an integral component. These stones are fairly inexpensive but require special care not normally associated with ruby.

Jewelers continue to feature many less-expensive colored stones. As a result, prices for varieties of chalcedony, feldspar, and some garnets and tourmaline are rising. At present these increases are modest, but their recent lack of production has invited a climate where it won’t take much growth to exceed current supply.

Diamond: 1/4 ct. round

VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $1,430 $1,325 $1,125 $1,050
H $1,300 $1,190 $1,050 $920
I $1,170 $1,050 $950 $900
J $1,100 $1,000 $900 $850

Diamond: 1/2 ct. round

VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $2,775 $2,350 $1,875 $1,500
H $2,400 $2,050 $1,725 $1,425
I $1,950 $1,750 $1,500 $1,350
J $1,575 $1,500 $1,350 $1,200

Diamond: 1 ct. round

VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $6,075 $5,400 $4,575 $3,975
H $5,100 $4,650 $4,350 $3,825
I $4,125 $4,000 $3,800 $3,600
J $3,800 $3,600 $3,200 $3,000

Diamond: 2 ct. round

VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $12,300 $10,900 $9,400 $8,100
H $10,200 $9,400 $7,900 $7,200
I $8,700 $8,000 $7,200 $6,700
J $6,800 $6,300 $5,900 $5,500

Fancy Pink Diamond: 1 ct. radiant

VS SI I1
$60K–$85K $45K–$75K $30K–$43K

Red Spinel

Good Fine
2 to under 3 cts. $200–$550 $550–$900
3 to under 5 cts. $300–$650 $750–$2,500

Blue Sapphire

Good Fine
1 to under 2 cts. $150–$425 $425–$1,350
2 to under 3 cts. $350–$800 $800–$2,200

Akoya Pearls (by the strand)

Fine Extra-Fine
18-in. strands, 6 to 6.5 mm $650–$850 $1,000–$1,200

Nigerian Spessartite Garnet

Good Fine
1 to under 2 cts. $75–$90 $90–$120
2 to under 3 cts. $90–$125 $120–$160

Blue Zircon

Good Fine
1 to under 3 cts. $20–$55 $55–$90
3 to under 5 cts. $40–$80 $80–$175

Round Tahitian Black Pearls

Good Fine
8 to 8.5 mm $30–$60 $60–$120
10 to 10.5 mm $35–$90 $90–$150

Tanzanite

Good Fine
1 to under 2 cts. $175–$300 $300–$400
2 to under 5 cts. $250–$375 $375–$450

Pink Topaz

Good Fine
1 to under 3 cts. $125–$350 $350–$700
3 to under 5 cts. $180–$425 $425–$900

Prices shown represent actual wholesale memorandum prices paid by retail jewelers on a per-stone basis. All prices are per carat except for cultured pearls. No responsibility or liability is assumed for the consequences of the use of any information in this report, nor for errors or omissions. The terms Commercial, Good, Fine, and Extra-Fine are general classifications developed and used by The GemGuide. Each represents a range of individual quality grades. When they are used in conjunction with proper grading, one can accurately pinpoint a price from within the listed range. The GemGuide is published six times a year. A one-year subscription includes market reports and colored stone and diamond prices. For more information, contact Gemworld International Inc., 2640 Patriot Blvd., Suite 240, Glenview, IL 60026; (888) GEMGUIDE or (847) 657-0555, fax (847) 657-0550. U.S., Canada, $205 complete per year. Elsewhere $275 complete per year.