What Should I Do After the Sale?

I read in a jewelry trade magazine recently that up to 60 percent of bridal customers don’t buy their wedding bands from the store where they purchased the engagement ring. This is a startling statistic. There are several actions that will increase the likelihood that a customer will come back to us.

Send a personal thank-you note.

You should send a thank-you note not only to the people who buy from you but also to the people who do not buy from you. They might come back and thank you for the thank you. Then, while they’re in the store, you might have an opportunity to show them some merchandise. Send the thank you note three to five days after the purchase or event.

Make a follow-up telephone call.

Always make a follow-up telephone call after a sale or a sales presentation, especially when the customer has made a substantial purchase. The follow-up call should be made three to four weeks after the purchase or the event. If you’re making a follow-up call after a sales presentation that didn’t result in a sale, make the call within a day or two of the presentation and offer another reason for the customer to come back and look again. Examples include newly arrived merchandise, a special order that’s finished and awaiting pickup, or another vendor catalog to see.

Use your business cards.

Many salespeople think of their business cards as a way to fill space on their desks or as a get-out-of-the-store-free card. A business card should be used to get your name out to the public and as another marketing tool. An excellent method of building referrals and personal trade is through sending or handing out your business cards. Tell your customers that you would like to give them a few business cards for their reference file—and to give to anyone else they know who may be in the market for fine jewelry. It can be a very effective tool.

Send cards.

As long as you’ve taken the time and effort to complete a customer profile form for each of your customers, you might as well use the information to your advantage. You should have the customer’s birth date, anniversary date, etc. It’s worth the time and effort to send them a greeting card. If you really want to stand out from the crowd, pick another holiday—in addition to the traditional ones—and send greeting cards to the top 20 percent of your customer base. If you’re Irish, send a St. Patrick’s Day card. If you’re especially fond of the Fourth of July, send an Independence Day card.

Create a company newsletter.

Another excellent means of keeping your name in front of your customer base is to develop a company newsletter. It can include updates of current or upcoming events, articles on the care and cleaning of jewelry, and numerous other topics.

All five of these strategies are designed to keep your name in front of your customers and prospects. In turn, you will develop personal trade, repeat customers, and referral business. It is my opinion that you should get your name in front of your customer base a minimum of six times per year.