Gem Pricing Report

Mining operations in major producing nations remain at a standstill. Key markets are seeing few foreign buyers. Colored stone markets across the globe report sparse trading activity. Prices are stable for most loose gem products, although cash buyers are reaping the benefits of a buyers’ market.

Thai dealers report that once-active trading centers have been empty because of the Burma embargo. They claim it’s harming not only small-scale Burmese miners but also the network of Thai dealers and traders that brought these goods to market. The Thai gem industry feels that its members—and not the United States—are being forced to live with the consequences of the policy. In an overture that offers some hope, Secretary of State Clinton reportedly has signaled a willingness to reexamine the policy toward Myanmar.

In February, colored stone pricing showed more softening in the commercial and lower-good grades for many varieties. Finer grades, however, showed a surprising resistance to price erosion, especially for sapphire, tourmaline, and emerald. Red spinel prices posted an increase in the finer grades. The most active areas of the colored stone market are being driven by designer and custom shops.

Diamond prices continue to erode. However, major producers have aggressively curbed production to fend off further erosion. The market is adjusting to the redefined price points of cash-strapped consumers.

Prices shown represent actual wholesale memorandum prices paid by retail jewelers on a per-stone basis. All prices are per carat except for cultured pearls. No responsibility or liability is assumed for the consequences of the use of any information in this report, nor for errors or omissions. The terms Commercial, Good, Fine, and Extra-Fine are general classifications developed and used by The Gem Guide. Each represents a range of individual quality grades. When they are used in conjunction with proper grading, one can accurately pinpoint a price from within the listed range. A one-year subscription to The Gem Guide includes six diamond issues (bimonthly); six newsletters (bimonthly); two colored-stone issues including pearls, opals, and jade (biannual). For more information, contact Gemworld International Inc., 2640 Patriot Blvd., Suite 240, Glenview, IL 60026; (888) GEMGUIDE or (847) 657-0555, fax (847) 657-0550. U.S., Canada, $205 complete per year. Elsewhere $275 complete per year.

Diamond: 1/4 ct. round

VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $1,430 $1,325 $1,125 $1,050
H $1,300 $1,190 $1,050 $920
I $1,170 $1,050 $950 $900
J $1,100 $1,000 $900 $850

Diamond: 1/2 ct. round

VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $2,775 $2,350 $1,875 $1,500
H $2,400 $2,050 $1,725 $1,425
I $1,950 $1,750 $1,500 $1,350
J $1,575 $1,500 $1,350 $1,200

Diamond: 1 ct. round

VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $6,075 $5,400 $4,575 $3,975
H $5,100 $4,650 $4,350 $3,825
I $4,125 $4,000 $3,800 $3,600
J $3,800 $3,600 $3,200 $3,000

Diamond: 2 ct. round

VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $12,300 $10,900 $9,400 $8,100
H $10,200 $9,400 $7,900 $7,200
I $8,700 $8,000 $7,200 $6,700
J $6,800 $6,300 $5,900 $5,500

Fancy Pink Diamond: 1 ct. radiant

VS SI I1
$60K–$85K $45K–$75K $30K–$43K

Red Spinel

Good Fine
2 to under 3 cts. $150–$500 $500–$800
3 to under 5 cts. $250–$550 $750–$2,500

Blue Sapphire

Good Fine
1 to under 2 cts. $125–$420 $420–$1,250
2 to under 3 cts. $325–$750 $750–$2,000

Akoya Pearls (by the strand)

Fine Extra-Fine
18-in. strands,6 to 6.5 mm $650–$850 $1,000–$1,200

Nigerian Spessartite Garnet

Good Fine
1 to under 2 cts. $75–$90 $90–$120
2 to under 3 cts. $90–$125 $120–$160

Blue Zircon

Good Fine
1 to under 3 cts. $20–$50 $50–$75
3 to under 5 cts. $35–$75 $75–$150

Round Tahitian Black Pearls

Good Fine
8 to 8.5 mm $30–$60 $60–$120
10 to 10.5 mm $35–$90 $90–$150

Tanzanite

Good Fine
1 to under 2 cts. $175–$325 $300–$400
2 to under 5 cts. $250–$450 $400–$475

Pink Topaz

Good Fine
1 to under 3 cts. $125–$350 $350–$700
3 to under 5 cts. $180–$425 $425–$900