Gem Pricing Report

The U.S. gemstone industry remains weak. Domestic jewelry producers also report weak activity. Tightened credit requirements continue to restrain consumer spending. Forward-thinking manufacturers have shifted to products with price points supportable by current market conditions, which increased the use of melee in finished goods. Likewise, the marketing of less-expensive but attractive nontraditional gems continues to rise, especially with designers and custom jewelers. As a result, consumers have a choice of gemstone jewelry in a broad range of price points.

Catching the eye of consumers is the key to success. Unusual designs and creative use of colors are utilized to grab attention. Use of rough crystals in finished jewelry has expanded from the fringes to mainstream designers.

In color stones, retailers report that blue sapphire remains the top seller, but favorably priced fine blue spinel has dramatically cut into sapphire sales. Similarly, demand for red spinel is strong, especially in the collectors’ market, because of its reputation as an unenhanced stone as well as excitement generated by a handful of newer finds.

Overseas markets are enjoying attractive growth. Asian and European jewelry manufacturing centers are active. However, analysts agree that even with the strong consumer classes that have emerged in China and India, among other places, sustainable growth in the gemstone industry cannot come without improvement to the U.S. economy.

Diamond: 1/4 ct. round

  VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $1,430 $1,325 $1,125 $1,050
H $1,300 $1,190 $1,050 $920
I $1,170 $1,050 $950 $900
J $1,100 $1,000 $900 $850

Diamond: 1/2 ct. round

  VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $2,775 $2,350 $1,875 $1,500
H $2,400 $2,050 $1,725 $1,425
I $1,950 $1,750 $1,500 $1,350
J $1,575 $1,500 $1,350 $1,200

Diamond: 1 ct. round

  VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $6,075 $5,400 $4,575 $3,975
H $5,100 $4,650 $4,350 $3,825
I $4,125 $4,000 $3,800 $3,600
J $3,800 $3,600 $3,200 $3,000

Diamond: 2 ct. round

  VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $12,300 $10,900 $9,400 $8,100
H $10,200 $9,400 $7,900 $7,200
I $8,700 $8,000 $7,200 $6,700
J $6,800 $6,300 $5,900 $5,500

Fancy Pink Diamond: 1 ct. radiant

VS SI I1
$60K–$85K $45K–$75K $30K–$43K

Red Spinel

  Good Fine
2 to under 3 cts. $150–$500 $500–$800
3 to under 5 cts. $250–$550 $750–$2,500

Blue Sapphire

  Good Fine
1 to under 2 cts. $125–$420 $420–$1,250
2 to under 3 cts. $325–$750 $750–$2,000

Akoya Pearls (by the strand)

  Fine Extra-Fine
18-in. strands, 6 to 6.5 mm $650–$850 $1,000–$1,200

Nigerian Spessartite Garnet

  Good Fine
1 to under 2 cts. $75–$90 $90–$120

Blue Zircon

  Good Fine
1 to under 3 cts. $20–$50 $50–$75
3 to under 5 cts. $35–$75 $75–$150

Round Tahitian Black Pearls

  Good Fine
8 to 8.5 mm $30–$60 $60–$120
10 to 10.5 mm $35–$90 $90–$150

Tanzanite

  Good Fine
1 to under 2 cts. $175–$325 $300–$400
2 to under 5 cts. $250–$450 $400–$475

Pink Topaz

  Good Fine
1 to under 3 cts. $125–$350 $350–$700
3 to under 5 cts. $180–$425 $425–$900

Prices shown represent actual wholesale memorandum prices paid by retail jewelers on a per-stone basis. All prices are per carat except for cultured pearls. No responsibility or liability is assumed for the consequences of the use of any information in this report, nor for errors or omissions. The terms Commercial, Good, Fine, and Extra-Fine are general classifications developed and used by The Gem Guide. Each represents a range of individual quality grades. When they are used in conjunction with proper grading, one can accurately pinpoint a price from within the listed range. A one-year subscription to The Gem Guide includes six diamond issues (bimonthly); six newsletters (bimonthly); two colored-stone issues including pearls, opals, and jade (biannual). For more information, contact Gemworld International Inc., 2640 Patriot Blvd., Suite 240, Glenview, IL 60026; (888) GEMGUIDE or (847) 657-0555, fax (847) 657-0550. U.S., Canada, $205 complete per year. Elsewhere $275 complete per year.