Gem Pricing Report

The colored stone market has turned attention toward the February Tucson Gem Fair. Dealers are expressing cautious optimism that the show will indicate an uptick in retail demand. Currently, market demand is focused on finer-quality as well as unusual gems but has been generally weak. Demand for mid-grade material is still soft.

Retailers report that blue sapphire remains the most popular colored stone in the U.S. market. Emeralds are expected to enjoy healthy demand this year.

Buyers can expect better-quality stones to be in short supply. Earlier this year mining slowed and in some cases was suspended completely at deposits around the world because of the lack of buyers. Several closures lasted months. The strategy averted an oversupply that could have sharply eroded price levels. By early fall, production had resumed at these operations, signaling a rise in demand. However, with production down for many popular gems, prices are expected to be surprisingly firm this year in Tucson. Expected strong sellers are red and blue spinel; blue as well brown through golden colors of zircon; spessartite garnet; and many agates, which are popular among designers.

The current strength of the euro and British pound offer European buyers strong incentive to attend this year’s show.

In general, fine-quality natural stones are the focus of current demand. This will be even more apparent in Tucson when buyers get a sense of the premiums that some fine-quality stones are bringing.

Diamond: 1/4 ct. round

VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $1,430 $1,325 $1,125 $1,050
H $1,300 $1,190 $1,050 $920
I $1,170 $1,050 $950 $900
J $1,100 $1,000 $900 $850

Diamond: 1/2 ct. round

VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $2,775 $2,350 $1,875 $1,500
H $2,400 $2,050 $1,725 $1,425
I $1,950 $1,750 $1,500 $1,350
J $1,575 $1,500 $1,350 $1,200

Diamond: 1 ct. round

VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $6,075 $5,400 $4,575 $3,975
H $5,100 $4,650 $4,350 $3,825
I $4,125 $4,000 $3,800 $3,600
J $3,800 $3,600 $3,200 $3,000

Diamond: 2 ct. round

VS1 VS2 SI1 SI2
G $12,300 $10,900 $9,400 $8,100
H $10,200 $9,400 $7,900 $7,200
I $8,700 $8,000 $7,200 $6,700
J $6,800 $6,300 $5,900 $5,500

Fancy Pink Diamond: 1 ct. radiant

VS SI I1
$60K–$85K $45K–$75K $30K–$43K

Red Spinel

Good Fine
2 to under 3 cts. $200–$550 $550–$900
3 to under 5 cts. $300–$650 $750–$2,500

Blue Sapphire

Good Fine
1 to under 2 cts. $150–$425 $425–$1,350
2 to under 3 cts. $350–$800 $800–$2,200

Akoya Pearls (by the strand)

Fine Extra-Fine
18-in. strands, 6 to 6.5 mm $650–$850 $1,000–$1,200

Nigerian Spessartite Garnet

Good Fine
1 to under 2 cts. $75–$90 $90–$120
2 to under 3 cts. $90–$125 $120–$160

Blue Zircon

Good Fine
1 to under 3 cts. $20–$55 $55–$90
3 to under 5 cts. $40–$80 $80–$175

Round Tahitian Black Pearls

Good Fine
8 to 8.5 mm $30–$60 $60–$120
10 to 10.5 mm $35–$90 $90–$150

Tanzanite

Good Fine
1 to under 2 cts. $175–$300 $300–$400
2 to under 5 cts. $250–$375 $375–$450

Pink Topaz

Good Fine
1 to under 3 cts. $125–$350 $350–$700
3 to under 5 cts. $180–$425 $425–$900

Prices shown represent actual wholesale memorandum prices paid by retail jewelers on a per-stone basis. All prices are per carat except for cultured pearls. No responsibility or liability is assumed for the consequences of the use of any information in this report, nor for errors or omissions. The terms Commercial, Good, Fine, and Extra-Fine are general classifications developed and used by The GemGuide. Each represents a range of individual quality grades. When they are used in conjunction with proper grading, one can accurately pinpoint a price from within the listed range. The GemGuide is published six times a year. A one-year subscription includes market reports and colored stone and diamond prices. For more information, contact Gemworld International Inc., 2640 Patriot Blvd., Suite 240, Glenview, IL 60026; (888) GEMGUIDE or (847) 657-0555, fax (847) 657-0550. U.S., Canada, $205 complete per year. Elsewhere $275 complete per year.