Diamonds: A New Online Price Guide, Crater State Park & More



Price Line

A free diamond price guide has premiered online, promising consumers “real market pricing.”

Max’s Diamond Price Guide (accessible at diamondpriceinfo.com) began because its founders—veterans of used-car resource Kelley Blue Book—“saw a niche,” says vice president of marketing Michael Muttert.

“We were sitting around with a drink or two, and came up with this idea,” Muttert says. “We tried to shoot holes in it, but we couldn’t shoot holes big enough.” The site has recruited advisors from the industry; however, Muttert did not want to reveal names.

Max’s prices are derived from research mixed with a “proprietary algorithm.” The resource includes price guides for both online and retail shoppers and does not price diamonds smaller than a half carat, greater than 5 carats, or of K-L-M clarity.

“We are not trying to sell diamonds,” Muttert says. “We are meeting the needs of retail customers.”

Filling Holes in the Crater

Kimberley comes to Arkansas.

The Crater of Diamonds State Park—the Murfreesboro, Ark.–based diamond producing park that allows the general public to search for gems—now provides information on the Kimberley Process at the request of the U.S. State Department, park officials tell JCK.

A brochure explains that searchers do not need a KP certificate to remove a diamond from the park as long as it remains within the United States, but they will need one if the stone crosses an international border. In addition, the KP only applies to rough diamonds.

Since 1972, the park has let visitors keep the diamonds they find. In 2009, 918 stones were discovered—with 29 of them weighing more than 1 ct. The largest diamond ever found was a 16.37 ct. stone, unearthed in 1975.

O My!

The Argyle diamond mine in Western Australia is celebrating its 25th year of operation by introducing a specially designed piece, the Argyle Pink Diamonds Limited Edition O Pendant. It features more than 1 ct. t.w. of precious Argyle pink diamonds, pavé set in 18k rose gold. The “O” is invisibly mounted on a diamond-set 18k white gold link chain. Only 100 are available.

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