The ‘Harry Potter’ Ring That Went Viral



A Harry Potter–inspired ring went viral this week, sending shoppers flying to get a piece of the boy who lived—and its designer scrambling to fulfill orders from her small Kingston, Ontario, shop.

The Harry Potter Golden Snitch Ring comes in silver and gold with citrine, topaz, sapphire, and moissanite stone options. The stones are all honey-colored, and the band is texturized to resemble the Snitch’s famous wings (in Potter lore, the Snitch is one of three balls used to play the game Quidditch). The ring retails for $140, with an 18k white gold option that costs $1,120.  

The ring is not official merchandise, as designer Miranda Scott clarifies on her site (and quite sweetly, actually) with a small poem:

At this ring, have a look
It was inspired by a book
If you’re a wizard or witch
You could use it to get hitched
In gold or silver it may be bought
but official merchandise, it is not
Allow 3-4 weeks for me to make it for you,
and J.K Rowling, if you’re reading this—please don’t sue. 

“It’s been a lot of attention very quickly,” Scott told JCK from her store in Ontario. Last week she temporarily closed down her Etsy storefront after the ring went viral—she literally couldn’t keep up with processing and answering queries. 

“I have been making the Snitch ring for about a year,” she says. “The attention was completely unexpected.” The post that started it all: a quick write-up on BuzzFeed on Jan. 16 (This “Harry Potter” Golden Snitch Engagement Ring Is Perfect), which has led to write-ups on Gawker, the Daily Mail, the Gloss, and more. 

She has now reopened the store, though warns that the turnover time for all orders is now four to five weeks.

Scott completed the three-year jewelry arts program at George Brown College in Toronto and has made a living as a jeweler since she graduated three years ago, first independently and now as half of Alchemy House Jewellery, a brick-and-mortar store she launched with her friend and fellow jeweler Talia Pennachetti just four months ago.

Scott’s designs range from classic to playful and also include pieces inspired by the popular video game Legend of Zelda and the cult-favorite animated series Adventure Time.

Like many young jewelers, Etsy helped her get her footing in the business. “My Etsy store supported me full time for two years,” she says. “Now I’d guess that 85 percent of our orders come through Etsy.”

Scott says she and Pennachetti would like to be able to wholesale their designs eventually, though the two-woman shop hasn’t found the time yet. 

She estimates that since the ring went viral, 90 percent of her orders have been for the Snitch ring. “It’s overwhelming,” she says, her voice tinged with exhaustion and excitement. “Especially because custom work at the store is also picking up,” she says.

The Snitch ring is a prime example of the adage of Internet times: That when a design goes viral, it can be a blessing (“Accio orders!”) and a curse (“Accio workload!”).

Private: The Harry Potter Ring That Went Viral

A Harry Potter-inspired ring went viral this week, sending shoppers flying to get a piece of the boy who lived—and its designer scrambling to fulfill orders from her small Kingston, Ontario shop.

The ring is the Harry Potter Golden Snitch Ring in silver and gold options with citrine, topaz, sapphire, and moissanite stone options. The stones are all honey-colored, and the band is texturized to resemble the Snitch’s famous wings (in Potter lore, the Snitch is one of three balls used to play the game Quidditch). The ring retails for $140, with a 18k white gold and option that costs $1,120. 

The ring is not official merchandise, Scott is sure to clarify on her site (and quite sweetly, actually, with a small poem: “At this ring, have a look/ It was inspired by a book/ If you’re a wizard or witch/ You could use it to get hitched/ In gold or silver it may be bought/ but official merchandise, it is not/ Allow 3-4 weeks for me to make it for you,/ and J.K Rowling, if you’re reading this -please don’t sue”). 

“It’s been a lot of attention very quickly,” Miranda Scott told JCK from her store in Ontario. Last week she temporarily closed down her Etsy storefront after the ring went viral—she literally couldn’t keep up with processing and answering queries. 

“I have been making the Snitch ring for about a year,” she says. “The attention was completely unexpected.” The post that started it all: a quick write-up on Buzzfeed on Jan. 16 (“This Harry Potter Golden Snitch Engagement Ring Is Perfect”), which has led to write-ups on Gawker, the Daily Mail, the Gloss, and more. 

She has now opened the store back up, though warns that the turnover time for all orders is now 4 to 5 weeks.

Scott completed the three-year jewelry arts program at George Brown College in Toronto and has made a living as a jeweler since she graduated three years ago, first independently and now as half of Alchemy House Jewellery, a brick-and-mortar store she launched with her friend and fellow jeweler Talia Pennachetti just four months ago.

Scott’s designs range from classic to playful, and also include pieces inspired by the popular video game Legend of Zelda and the cult-favorite animated series Adventure Time.

Like many young jewelers, Etsy helped her get her footing in the business. “My Etsy store supported me fulltime for two years,” she says. “Now I’d guess that 85 percent of our orders come through Etsy.”

Scott says she and Pennachetti would like to be able to wholesale their designs eventually, though the two-woman shop hasn’t found the time yet. 

She estimates that since the ring went viral, 90 percent of her orders have been for the Snitch ring. “It’s overwhelming,” she says, her voice tinged with exhaustion and excitement. “Especially because custom work at the store is also picking up, she says.

The Snitch ring is a prime example of the adage of Internet times: that when a design goes viral, it can be a blessing (“Accio orders!”) and a curse (“Accio workload!”).