More About “Pearls”: Lucky Magazine Minces No Words

The September 2009 issue of Lucky magazine (the first of this month’s long-anticipated fashion magazines to hit my mailbox – hurrah!) contains an article entitled “Maximize Your Clothing Budget” which provides “22 simple strategies for scoring the best deals and finding the wardrobe essentials you’ll turn to again and again.”

Along with some excellent tips relative to shopping for clothing and other types of accessories (for example, “When buying a bag, consider whether it’ll work with your winter coat. If the strap won’t fit comfortably over your shoulder, you won’t use it.”) and a few helpful tips for fashionistas on extremely tight budgets (”Before you fall in love with the perfect $20 skirt online, check the site’s shipping rates. Sometimes they blow the bargain.”) are two tips relating to jewelry.

First, in a point of view completely opposite to that of People magazine and its full-board endorsement of cheap “pearls” including a multi-strand necklace from Forever 21, Lucky magazine boldly states: “There is a wealth of great costume jewelry out there, which means you don’t have to splurge on the real thing. That said, skip the faux pearls. They tend to peel and show their age immediately.”

That’s a strong position from a magazine that caters to young women who, in general, are more concerned with scoring bargains than with evaluating the quality of jewelry. It will be interesting to see if Lucky keeps the faux pearls out of its editorial spreads.

However, the magazine’s endorsement of quality jewelry ends there. The second jewelry-related tip comes from a young clothing designer. She relates that she stocks up on chain necklaces from – you guessed it – Forever 21 and wears them “until they fall apart” and then knots a few of the remnants together “to make slightly messy, one-of-a-kind-looking pieces.”

No word on how long the chain necklaces last before they fall apart. It’s not exactly a ringing endorsement of quality, but if one chooses to buy lemons, one might as well make lemonade.