JCK Show: Gearing sales to individuals

In his seminar “Selling Colored Stones: Fiction, Fact, and Fantasy,” the International Jewellery Confederation’s David Peters stressed the importance of powerful product statements in jewelry sales presentations.

Peters laid out a step-by-step process for tailoring individual sales presentations to individual customers, using colored stone jewelry examples.

When selling to customers, sales associates first need to identify three variables in reference to each possible customer, Peters says. First, who are they? Define their style, preferences, and budget. Then determine their buying motivation, whether it’s a gift for a special occasion or a personal treat. After establishing those two factors, narrow down the product category in which the customer is most interested.

After identifying the needs and tastes of the customer, Peters recommends moving in with a strong product statement. Describing the attributes, personality, and benefits of a specific piece of jewelry helps steer the customer toward purchase. Focus on the key features that make the piece desirable, using easy, simple language that will suit the short attention span of today’s customer. Also, stay away from too much industry terminology-if the customer doesn’t understand it, the sale may be jeopardized.

Also, use words to describe jewelry that may also be used to describe a person, as they may help to put into words the more intangible features of the piece. Words like “playful” and “stylish” can be particularly helpful and are also reassuringly nontechnical.

Finally, pulling the presentation together with a final product vision or summary statement will, according to Peters, “help the customer move to a comfortable place.” This is a simple statement that summarizes the core qualities of the piece-while still appealing to the customer’s emotions. If a man is thinking of buying a diamond pendant for his wife, describing that pendant as a symbol of his love will help pull him into the sale in a more personal manner.

It is crucial, according to Peters, that each sales presentation be tailored to each customer and his or her separate needs, so sales representatives need to keep their eyes open and not be afraid to ask questions.