At Your Service: “What Are Your Techniques for Dealing With an Angry Customer?”

Every other week we ask retailers how they handle client requests, questions, and conundrums. This week we asked: “What are your techniques for dealing with an angry customer?”

“Seldom do I have to deal with an angry customer, because our clientele recognizes quality and our pieces are all high-end retail, such as Rolex and Tacori. However, sometimes we have a person who comes in and they realize that they’ve bought something somewhere else that’s not the quality they thought and they ask us to fix it. We let the customer know in a nice way that we’ll try to do something if we think we can and if they can afford it. It’s all about communication and letting the customer know what can be done.”
Roberto Ramirez, sales manager, Dennis Jewelry, San Antonio

“We train our employees to deal with angry customers when they’re hired. We like to empower all of our people to do what they can to help our clientele. We try to make it as pleasant as we can. Our policy is that if a customer is unhappy with their purchase, we listen to them. We don’t interrupt because usually want they want is to vent. Then we apologize and offer solutions. If it’s something that’s our fault, we deal with the solution the best way we can. Sometimes we even give a full refund. Our motto is that we do whatever it takes to make our customer happy.”
—Jay Klos, owner of Grogan Jewelers, Huntsville, Ala.

“Whether or not you are at fault their feelings are real. One: Empathize. Two: Validate their feelings. Three: If you are responsible, apologize. If not responsible, you can still express your regret that they have had a negative experience. Four: Find options to fix the problem whether or not you are at fault. You don’t necessarily have to take a financial burden, but you can often find a way to resolve their issue to their satisfaction.”
—Diamond Girl Consulting, via Facebook

“Stay calm. Apologize. If it’s your fault, take complete responsibility. If not, try your best to find a mutually agreeable solution.”
—Sarah Schaffer, via Facebook