The 10 Best JCK Covers: 1930–1950

During the turbulent years of 1930 to 1950, the United States underwent an almost unbelievable transformation.

The country went from an isolationist nation crippled by the Great Depression, to a hyper-productive industrialized war machine, and, finally, to one of the world’s only two superpowers with influence—both good and bad—in every country on the globe.

The era also produced unforgettable design in art, architecture, and even magazine covers. The covers included in the following collection gleam with Art Deco type and vibrant colors: a style easily identifiable with these decades.

Sadly, I had only two archive volumes from the 1930s, and just one from the 1940s. I can only imagine the other beautiful covers we produced during this time, and I encourage anyone who has any JCK magazines from this period tucked away somewhere to contact me.  


May 15, 1930

 Silver as a necessity to entertaining is a universal theme in advertising. As a utility the customer needs silver, but it is up to the jeweler to prove that the best is the cheapest, and that sterling is a lasting investment. —JCK magazine (May 1, 1930)


June 3, 1930


Aug. 15, 1930

Every jeweler realizes the importance of an attractive window, knows that symmetry in arrangement and timeliness in displaying merchandise are strong factors in stimulating sales. —JCK magazine (Aug. 7, 1930)


January 1930


February 1931


March 1931


The Keystone Jewelers’ Index 1931


August 1942

Teenagers may not have much money to spend today, but if you “catch ‘em while they’re young”—when they’re just beginning to form their habits—they’re pretty likely to stay with you as they grow older and come to you when they’re ready for an engagement ring, the silver, and so on. —JCK magazine (April 1942)


September 1942

“Nearly every family,” says Lawrence E. Hovey, Pasadena, Calif., retail jeweler, “has some piece of jewelry about which there is a sentimental factor. These pieces may be good or the may only be an inexpensive piece of sardonyx, but most of them can be restyled into something modern and artistic. The jeweler who will take the time and trouble to develop this restyling business will find he is opening up a field whose volume will surprise him.” —JCK magazine (September 1942)


December 1950

Perfume is vaporized jewelry. The sale of perfumes in jewelry stores is so logical that one wonders that it has not become an important part of the business before this. Probably the fault lies largely with the manufacturers in not sufficiently recognizing the possibilities and acquainting the jeweler with what they have to offer. —JCK magazine (October 1930)

For more on JCK covers throughout our 140-year history, check out: