Bejeweled Pop-Up Shop: New Jewelry Hot Spot in New York City

There’s a new jewelry hot spot in downtown New York City—but drag your feet and you might miss it.

The Bejeweled pop-up shop, which will be open through Dec. 31, opened its doors Oct. 6 on Gansevoort Street in the heart of Manhattan’s Meatpacking District. Jewelry designers Kerri Halpern of Madstone and Diana Heimann of Heimann & Hendrix conceptualized the ephemeral outpost, which wrangles the work of eight independent designers in one chic space.

The Bejeweled pop-up store on Gansevoort Street (courtesy of Studio PR)

“They decided they didn’t want to do retail the traditional route,” says Helena Krodell, director of Studio PR and publicist for the project.

The pair will manage the shop through the holidays, with the help of the other participating designers, who will be hosting various events and mingling with customers throughout the shop’s run. The week’s events, which will always include champagne and a live DJ, are posted on the front door.


The vintage-flashy “Pop Up” sign in the front window (courtesy of Studio PR)

The collections—Anne Sportun Fine Jewellery, Caleo Jewelry, Erica Molinari, Kacey K, MAD by Madstone and Madstone, Heimann & Hendrix, Mauri Pioppo Fine Jewelry, and Michael Raymond Jewelry—are mostly fine, but also include pieces in the bridge category. Prices range from $150 to upwards of $20,000.

Look for slice cocktail rings (Caleo), bohemian bead-and-diamond bracelets (Anne Sportun), pendants with seed pearls and gemstones (Erica Molinari), and geometric gemstone bracelets and macabre spider rings (Madstone).

The roughly 2,500-square-foot store—which includes white-painted concrete floors, proper glass jewelry cases, and a lounge with low couches and a fireplace, scented by high-end candles—also stocks men’s jewelry, watches, and a small collection of coffee table books related to fine jewelry.

The designers’ names printed on the glass of the shop’s façade (courtesy of Studio PR)

Despite its temporary status, the shop is announcing itself loudly to the neighborhood: a circus-esque red flashing sign announcing “Pop-Up Shop” traverses the length of the front window. And the sparkling merchandise inside the window’s eye-level museum cases will rotate regularly.

“It’s not your traditional pop-up with cardboard boxes and a temporary staff,” notes Krodell. “It’s beautiful. And it has a staff that understands fine jewelry.”

JCK Magazine Editor