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Fashion Trend: Graphic Knits

Knits shouldn’t be relegated to mothballs just yet. These vibrant picks from the Spring 2012 collections are ideal for that in-between weather: too breezy to go out unprotected, but too warm to still be sporting winter’s somber hues.

The three quarter sleeves keep this cotton and silk number from seeming too heavy.

Burberry Prorsum striped knitted cotton and silk-blend sweater, $995.

There’s a masculine, vintage quality to this print.

Bottega Veneta woven cotton-blend sweater, $750.

A much more polished take on the tank top.

Proenza Schouler printed coated knitted top, $1,350.

Graphic, simple, and would look so smart over crisp white jeans.

Alexander Wang double-faced intarsia cotton-blend sweater, $750.

You’ll be surprised how often you reach for this when the typical monochrome sweaters in your closet just seem a bit too dull.

Étoile Isabel Marant Zena patterned wool sweater, $405.

A great print that gives a definite nod towards the season’s athletic-inspired trend.

Derek Lam waffle-knit tank, $590.

The super-light knit and wide neck feel completely spring-appropriate, even in the heavy black.

Sonia by Sonia Rykiel color-block ribbed wool sweater, $295.

It might take some guts to pull off this mélange of prints, but warmer weather seems to beg for bold sartorial choices.

Tory Burch Aldwyn patchwork cotton cardigan, $325.

A year-round staple.

Jason Wu Varsity wool sweater, $895.

A tee can read as casual, but when it’s done in cashmere, it’s anything but.

Clements Ribeiro Intarsia cashmere sweater, $1,210

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